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Tag Archives: Hyperion Brewing Company

Hyperion sets grand opening date

hyperion_logoI first met Alexandra McKeown and Troy Orton of Hyperion Brewing Company at a kickoff event for the brewery at Community Loaves in Murray Hill more than a year ago. The event was low-key, but served to introduce Orton’s brewing skills and McKeown’s marketing skills. On those counts it was an unmitigated success.

Hyperion’s concept rests on Orton’s ability to craft a large number of tasty brews on the brewery’s one-barrel system and to askew the notion of having several core beers available on at all times. While that original concept may have changed a bit, the central idea remains. The brewery will serve a rotating

“We prefer flights to flagships,” said Hyperion owner McKeown. “We believe in freedom of choice. Our goal is to let the public decide what our core beers should be.”

Data from the brewery’s tap room point-of-sale system and guest feedback will be used to determine which brews will be brewed for distribution in the future.

Another aim for Hyperion was to open in an emerging neighborhood. The goal was to help in the renaissance of the area and to become a draw to bring more people into the area and bring vibrancy. After a long search, several false starts, and a bit of a rezoning fight with the city of Jacksonville, a location on Main Street in the Springfield National Historic District was chosen.

At a preview of their facility afforded to residents of their new Springfield home, Orton and McKeown showed off blueprints and concept drawings for the space. The brewery will occupy two store fronts on Main Street, but only one will be utilized at first. The other side will be used for expansion in future as demand warrants.

Within just a few weeks of the preview, the façade of the store fronts were painted black and the company’s logo appeared above the roll up door. In addition, the words, “Bold, Rebellious Beer Coming Soon,” were painted on the door.

On May 19th, the hard work and preparation will come to its fruition as Hyperion Brewing Company holds its grand opening celebration and welcomes guests for the fits time. The celebration will begin with a ribbon cutting ceremony at 4:30 p.m. and will be followed by the doors to the taproom opening to the public at 5:00 p.m. As an added bonus, the first 50 guests will receive a Hyperion branded tasting glass and a coupon for a free beer at a later date. To feed hungry beer-lovers, Hyperion has enlisted the help of Springfield-based Eddis and Sons food truck to serve legitimate Philly-style cheese steak sandwiches.

The taproom will boast 15 taps, but will only have limited Hyperion selections on opening day.

“We’ll be brewing at a break-neck pace to have as many of our beers ready for the grand opening as possible,” says head brewer Orton.

Crowlers – over-sized cans that can be filled and then sealed – will be offers in the taproom affording patrons the ability to take Hyperion brews home from the brewery. A limit of two crowlers per person will apply on the opening weekend.

Hyperion has also made arrangements with the Jax Brew Bus to shuttle beaches residents to the brewery with departures from Green Room Brewing Company at 4:30 p.m., 6:15 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets for the round trip are $15 and all riders must be 21 years of age or older.

 
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Posted by on April 4, 2017 in Beer, brewery

 

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Second craft brewery wins rezoning approval and green light to open in Jacksonville’s Springfield Historic District

mainstreet

Image by MetroJacksnville.com

Last night, Tuesday, December 13, 2016, Hyperion Brewing Company officially became the second brewery to receive approval to open on Main Street in the Springfield National Historic District. With a Jacksonville city counsel vote consisting of 18 yeas and one nay, the brewery helmed by Alexandra McKeown and brewer Troy Orton will open at 1740 Main Street.

As I have noted in the past, this is exactly the type of business needed to help revitalize the Main Street Business District and bring other, quality businesses to the area. Time after time other cities have seen breweries bring enormous boosts to areas in need of restoration.

And, I am not the only one that says breweries bring gentrification. James Fallows, a freelance writer who, and his wife Deborah spent three years working on a project for The Atlantic that sought to find out what factors lead to the success of American cities following the Recession of 2007-2008. In the article, Fallows created a list of items that indicated a city was bouncing back. The final item on his list is of particular interest to beer-lovers.

“One final marker,” Fallows wrote. “Perhaps the most reliable: A city on the way back will have one or more craft breweries… A town that has craft breweries also has a certain kind of entrepreneur, and a critical mass of mainly young customers.”
Fallows was not the only advocate for craft breweries as economic engines for change. An article in USA Today published July 6, 2016 cites multiple examples of how craft breweries improved down-trodden and undesirable neighborhoods.

“The arrival of a craft brewery,” the article stated. “Was also often one of the first signs that a neighborhood was changing.”

One example cited by the article is the story of how Great Lakes Brewing Company transformed the downtown Ohio City neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio from a decaying district, “Marred by abandoned buildings and boarded-up stores,” to a thriving market district complete with a renovated market, specialty shops, bars and restaurants.

The examples of what a craft brewery can do for a neighborhood are even visible right here in Jacksonville. To provide proof of the benefit craft breweries can have on a neighborhood at a Land Use and Zoning committee meeting, I looked at property values in the Silvertown neighborhood of Jacksonville where Intuition Ale Works maintains a brewery and Bold City Brewing Company has both a brewery and a tap room.

The results of my informal and unscientific study showed a staggering 18% increase in property values over the past eight years. It also showed an increase in home renovations and property sales. This is significant because Bold City opened in 2008 — eight years ago — followed by Intuition in 2010.

With Main & Six Brewing Company and now Hyperion Brewing Company coming within just a block of each other, Main Street is poised for rapid growth. This growth can only serve to increase property values for long-suffering Springfield residents who, though the neighborhood is growing and attracting younger families and professionals, have longed for a catalyst to spark the rejuvenation of the Main Street shopping district.

Only time will tell if the addition of Hyperion and Main & Six breweries will foster more interest in Main Street from other businesses. But, if the examples of other urban neighborhoods holds true, things are definitely looking up. In the meantime, Springfield residents will soon have the benefit of being able to walk to their own local breweries. And that ain’t bad.
 
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Posted by on December 14, 2016 in Beer, Local Brewery

 

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